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3 Ways to Make Money off Elon Musk Without Owning a Single Share of Tesla

Written by Keith Kohl
Posted April 7, 2021

Elon Musk woke up this morning worth nearly $170 billion.

After six hours of sleep and a quick shower and shave, I imagine his first cup of coffee is steaming hot and ready for him by the time he makes it downstairs.

Once his kids are safely off to school and he’s made the quiet commute to work (whether it’s in a Model S, Model X, or Cybertruck, the engine is going to be as silent as a mouse… Trust me, I’ve hit one before), Musk has said his mornings are typically engaged in engineering and design conversations.

On this particular morning, he may have smiled when his company opened the trading day valued around $657 billion.

That’s a lot of cheddar.

And depending with whom you’re speaking, Tesla is either wildly overpriced or a fraction of what the stock will be worth years down the road.

Let the investment herd fight that battle with each other.

Lean a little closer and let me whisper something in your ear...

It doesn’t matter.”

Look, whether or not you personally believe those shares are worth that much is a discussion for another day. No matter how overvalued (or undervalued) you believe Tesla shares are right now, there’s no denying that they’ve made long-term shareholders a fortune.

Just think, when Tesla went public in June 2010, shares were worth $17 apiece.

Put it this way — if you had bought $50,000 worth of the stock back then and sold it all today, you’d be sitting on a cool $2 million right now.

But here’s a dirty little secret…

You don’t need to own a single share of Tesla to make a fortune off of Elon Musk over the next few years.

Let me show you three ways to do it right now.

Before you start thinking of the stars, no, these opportunities have absolutely nothing to do with Mars.

Three Ways to Make Money off Elon Musk Without Owning a Single Share of Tesla

Unless you’ve been living in a cave during the pandemic, you’ve probably heard of President Biden’s $2.25 trillion infrastructure plan.

When most people hear the word “infrastructure,” the first things that come to mind are roads and bridges. Don’t get me wrong, we’ve talked about the sobering state of America’s crumbling infrastructure.

However, the infrastructure that we will be laying down now is the single-most important obstacle for Tesla here in the United States. After all, one of the biggest factors holding people back from finally making that switch from their traditional ICE vehicles to an EV is the fact that gas stations are simply more prevalent.

That’s about to change.

EV infrastructure has become a priority in the president’s infrastructure plan, which includes $135 billion in EV credits, a goal of 500,000 chargers nationwide, and even plans to replace 50,000 transit vehicles that run on diesel to electric.

If this plan successfully makes its way through Congress, we’re going to witness the electrification of the U.S. transportation sector far, far quicker than most expected.

Yet this is just one incredibly profitable facet of the EV boom.

You see, the major automakers that will play a huge role in producing tomorrow’s fleet of electric vehicles are prepping themselves now in another way — they’re securing their supply of battery metals now!

We already know about Tesla’s plan to build a cathode facility and lithium-hydroxide refinery in Texas to help feed into the company’s Terafactory.

But it's not the only one looking ahead.

Last week, BMW inked a $335 million lithium deal with Livent, the latter of which will supply lithium directly to BMW’s battery cell manufacturers as early as next year. Granted, BMW previously shelled out $636 million in 2019 to Ganfeng Lithium for its supply of lithium hydroxide.

Investors who wrote off lithium years ago will soon see the exorbitant demand growth you and I were discussing all the way back in 2015. Producers like Orocobre Ltd., which operates the Olaroz Lithium Facility in the Jujuy Province in Argentina, are among the few lithium producers that will be crucial for meeting that future demand.

And the third opportunity in the ongoing EV revolution is that few people have caught onto the fact that lithium-ion batteries are recyclable.

Of course, I’ll note that one new study showed the carbon footprint from recycling EV batteries is almost 40% smaller than extracting the raw materials. This market may be relatively young now; it was only valued around $1.5 billion in 2019.

By 2025, it's expected to exceed $12 billion and expand at a CAGR of 8.3% between 2025 and 2030.

Forget putting your money into Musk's pocket. Perhaps it's time he puts some in yours.

Until next time,

Keith Kohl Signature

Keith Kohl

follow basic@KeithKohl1 on Twitter

A true insider in the energy markets, Keith is one of few financial reporters to have visited the Alberta oil sands. His research has helped thousands of investors capitalize from the rapidly changing face of energy. Keith connects with hundreds of thousands of readers as the Managing Editor of Energy & Capital as well as Investment Director of Angel Publishing's Energy Investor. For years, Keith has been providing in-depth coverage of the Bakken, the Haynesville Shale, and the Marcellus natural gas formations — all ahead of the mainstream media. For more on Keith, go to his editor's page.

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