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New Market Worth Billions Emerges From the 2020 Election

Written by Keith Kohl
Posted November 4, 2020

Anything exciting happen last night?

Granted, things are a bit more confusing this time as we sit and wait for a decisive result from several key battleground states.

Usually, offices and workplaces are buzzing after an election of this magnitude. Depending on the mood, the range of emotions you’ll witness is nothing short of extraordinary.

Either way, everyone seems to be stuck in the same place, watching and waiting to be told the outcome.

The water cooler conversations in our office are a bit different.

Yet something peculiar happened this morning when I ran into my colleague Jeff Siegel.

The temptation to ask his thoughts on the previous night’s election ambiguity was too great — I wanted to know where he stood.

All he did was give me a wry smile and laugh.

I knew right away what that meant. I’ve seen that look in his eyes countless times over the last 15 years that he’s been a cubicle cellmate of mine.

His readers are going to make a killing from this election.

Here’s how...

Unless you live in Oregon or around the D.C. beltway, there’s a good chance you have never heard of ballot measures 81 or 109.

These two ballot measures were proposed in Washington D.C. and Oregon, respectively.

The question put to voters yesterday was simple.

In D.C., a "yes" for Initiative 81 meant that police would place the noncommercial cultivation, distribution, possession, and use of entheogenic plants and fungi among the lowest of its priorities.

This includes ibogaine, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), and mescaline, as well as psilocybin and psilocin.

Ed Muskie would have been relieved to learn that this measure passed.

But to truly understand the opportunity that Jeff and his readers foresaw years ago, we have to go back to at least 2012 — the year Colorado and Washington became the first two states to legalize recreational cannabis.

For a little perspective, states had been slowly moving toward legalization for decades prior to this. Back in 1973, Texas changed its laws so that holding up to 4 ounces of marijuana would be a simple misdemeanor.

This was followed by several states decriminalizing marijuana in the '70s, including Oregon.

In 1996, California legalized medical cannabis, which lead to a number of states soon following suit. It took the Golden State another 20 years before it made marijuana legal for recreational use.

But no matter what timeline you find, the rise of the cannabis industry began with its use in the medical industry.

Just two years after California made marijuana recreational, the North American cannabis market had grown to a little over $10 billion.

The opportunity in pot stocks was too difficult to ignore.

An Untapped New Market Worth Billions

It was all too easy for investors like Jeff and his readers to take full advantage of the legal cannabis market. When I remarked that the industry has been good for portfolios, he chuckled.

You could say that,” he said. “We milked that industry for all it's worth.”

Jeff wasn’t exaggerating, either.

You see, Jeff’s readers were the first investors to seize on the opportunity of legal marijuana.

First he told me about the 1,174% they banked on Aphria back in 2018.

Then he mentioned the 3,015% profits they took on Canopy Growth Corporation.

Well, he certainly had my attention now.

But when I asked what’s next, that’s when I caught another smile.

Not only were Jeff and his readers paying keen attention to ballot measures 81 and 109...

But there’s been some speculation that the market for psychedelics (the entheogenic plants and fungi I mentioned earlier) could be worth roughly $5 billion annually.

Jeff is more than skeptical on that value, and his readers plan to rake in gains hand over fist as this new market grows.

You saw what happened to the cannabis industry, right?

By 2027, that market will be worth an estimated $73.6 billion at a CAGR of 18.1%.

Investment groups are already pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into developing psychedelic treatments, which are proving to be effective against an array of health issues such as PTSD, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, chronic pain, and even end-of-life anxiety.

I questioned whether that $5 billion is a ceiling for that industry.

Jeff said no — he sees this market growing astronomically over the next decade, and he’s laid out all of his painstakingly detailed research in this new investment report.

The moment he finished explaining the situation to me, I’ll confess that I immediately phoned my broker.

Don’t take my word for it — I strongly recommend you take just a few minutes and check out the details for yourself.

All I can do is open the door.

The next step is up to you.

Until next time,

Keith Kohl Signature

Keith Kohl

follow basic@KeithKohl1 on Twitter

A true insider in the energy markets, Keith is one of few financial reporters to have visited the Alberta oil sands. His research has helped thousands of investors capitalize from the rapidly changing face of energy. Keith connects with hundreds of thousands of readers as the Managing Editor of Energy & Capital as well as Investment Director of Angel Publishing's Energy Investor. For years, Keith has been providing in-depth coverage of the Bakken, the Haynesville Shale, and the Marcellus natural gas formations — all ahead of the mainstream media. For more on Keith, go to his editor's page.

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