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Investing in Molybdenum

The Legend of Masamune

Written by Luke Burgess
Posted April 29, 2010

Goro Nyudo Masamune had no way of knowing that a minor slip-up in his shop would kick off a global revolution in metals technology.

In fact, when the legendary Japanese sword smith accidentally knocked a small amount of grayish powder he'd been using as a holistic asthma medication into a mixture that would eventually end up as one of his prized blades, he considered scrapping the project and starting over.

It was sheer luck that he decided to take a chance and finish the weapon...

 

Because when he got done making this particular sword, the result was the world's first modern Katana — a Samurai's most important and most iconic tool.

Its blade was unusually hard yet unbelievably flexible, never needed sharpening, and could slice through a human body from collar bone to hip in a single stroke.

This happy accident put Japan at the forefront of the global weapons industry — a status they'd retain until the introduction of flintlock muskets nearly three centuries later.

But what Masanume could have never imagined was how his innovation would transform the science of metals in the centuries that followed.

This grayish powder that Masanume unintentionally added to his blade over seven centuries ago is a metal called molybdenum (muh-lib-duh-num), or moly for short.

It's a tongue-twisting word meaning 'lead-like' in Greek... Ironic, because this element not only possesses the 6th-highest melting point of all known metals, but is also a key ingredient in almost all of today's super-alloys.

Without molybdenum, the world wouldn't just be without Samurai swords.

Today, without moly's presence in modern alloys, you'd never be able to:

  • Drive a car – because your engine block relies on it for its strength and heat-resistance.

  • Fly in a plane – because jet engine components, especially fan blades, depend on it for durability.

  • Fire a gun – because no alloy could handle high pressures without it.

  • Build a skyscraper – because without it, construction steel would crumble under the tension.

For these same reasons, you'd also never be able to:

  • Store pressurized gas like hydrogen or oxygen.

  • Pump oil in massive quantities from the wells to the refineries.

  • Receive life-saving medical implants, such as artificial heart valves and stents.

Put simply, without this metal, no alloy designed to resist extreme heat, pressure, tension or corrosion could exist.

And right now, as it works overtime for modern industry, it could also be working for your portfolio.

Molybdenum prices took a serious hit in the face of the global recession. But they're just starting to recover...

And while it's difficult to profit from physical molybdenum, there are plenty of moly stocks on the market with high leverage.

One in particular is a small mining company with a market capitalization of just around $70 million, which has recently acquired a property in Idaho containing over $60 billion of moly.

It's the biggest unmined reserve of the metal in the world — big enough to supply global demand, at its current rate, for the next decade.

The reserve is so huge that every time this metal's price goes up 5 cents... the value of the property jumps by $200 million.

And in my latest report, I tell you everything you need to know about the company that could be netting you 50% gains per month — every month — for the next two years!

When you subscribe to Hard Money Millionaire, you'll get this report with the full lowdown on all the details of this company — including, of course, the name and stock symbol.

I invite you to join Hard Money Millionaire today... before the word on moly gets out and the stock skyrockets.

Good Investing,

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Luke Burgess
Editor, Energy and Capital
Investment Director, Hard Money Millionaire

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