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Eradicating Human Drivers... Forever

Big Tech's Plan to Take You Off the Road for Good

Written by Keith Kohl
Posted December 14, 2015 at 7:00PM

It's safe to say that most people can't get around without some kind of vehicle.

You have to get to work, to school, or just out to get groceries on a regular basis, and unless you're lucky enough to live near all three of those things, a bike won't cut it.

Cars aren't exactly the safest option, either...

Over 1.3 million people die in car crashes annually. In the U.S. alone, roughly 33,000 people on average died each year between 2009 and 2013.

The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that as much as 71% of fatal crashes included speeding as a cause in 2013. 33% of reported crashes wherein the driver's blood alcohol level was known cited high levels as a cause for the crash.

It's a dangerous practice, driving.

Yet those problems are about to be eliminated.

No, not because people are going to want to stop drinking or speeding...

It's because plans are in motion right now that will eradicate human drivers altogether.

Big Tech's Roadmap to the Future

Are we talking about the end of cars? Absolutely not.

Understand that this life-saving technology is going to be integrated into cars.

What's changing is who's in control of the car.

It's not a sci-fi story or some far-fetched futuristic theory; it's not a theory at all anymore.

Autonomous, or driverless, cars are already here, and they're quickly developing into an irreversibly disruptive, game-changing technology in the industry.

It was only a matter of time, right? After all, virtually everything else we do these days is automated — so why not driving?

And in case you're worried that this is going to drive companies out of the market, remember that the list of car companies working on their own autonomous vehicles are a Who's Who of the industry right now:

  • Nissan

  • Toyota

  • General Motors

  • Ford

  • Honda

  • Mercedes-Benz

  • Tesla Motors

But let's not forget that tech giants like Google and Apple are jumping into the mix right now, too.

The real question that should be on your mind, however, is who stands to win once this market is in full swing?

The answer is you.

The Dirty Secret Behind Driverless Technology Investments

We're talking some serious potential here — with $1.3 trillion pouring in the autonomous vehicle market every year!

The dirty little secret behind driverless technology is that those names I just threw out aren't the best opportunities available. Instead, the real undervalued gems in this market will be the small, virtually unknown players that will supply the essential parts for these new, safer cars.

You see, autonomous vehicles will need advanced computers, sensors, and software to function as safely as they possibly can. These components will be more important even than the design of the car itself.

Now, perhaps the only reason I know this is because I've seen individual investors like us capitalize on this situation already.

You see, one of our editors here, Chris DeHaemer, has had his hand dipped in this honey pot since the beginning.

But having me explain his unique investment approach doesn't do it justice, which is why I want you to learn the full details for yourself at absolutely no cost to you.

Until next time,

Keith Kohl Signature

Keith Kohl

follow basic@KeithKohl1 on Twitter

A true insider in the energy markets, Keith is one of few financial reporters to have visited the Alberta oil sands. His research has helped thousands of investors capitalize from the rapidly changing face of energy. Keith connects with hundreds of thousands of readers as the Managing Editor of Energy & Capital as well as Investment Director of Angel Publishing's Energy Investor. For years, Keith has been providing in-depth coverage of the Bakken, the Haynesville Shale, and the Marcellus natural gas formations — all ahead of the mainstream media. For more on Keith, go to his editor's page.

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